Selling a Home

Selling a Home? Keep following in mind when having your home inspected. All systems must be operable for the inspection. Appliances should function properly and not require power other than for normal operation. This means pilot lights should not require lighting, water supply valves should be in the on position and functional, gas furnaces should have gas on, plumbing fixtures supply valves should all be on, and all light bulbs should be present and functional.

Things to Know When Selling a Home

Selling a Home?Selling a home? Keep following in mind when having your home inspected. All systems must be operable for the inspection. Appliances should function properly and not require power other than for normal operation. This means pilot lights should not require lighting, water supply valves should be in the on position and functional, gas furnaces should have gas on, plumbing fixtures supply valves should all be on, and all light bulbs should be present and functional.

Systems access panels need to readily accessible with a minimum of 36″ of clearance. Per the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) Standards of Practice (SOP) the definition of READILY ACCESSIBLE:

Available for visual inspection without requiring moving of personal property, dismantling, destructive measures, or any action which will likely involve risk to persons or property. ASHI SOP 13.2 C Inspectors are NOT required to operate:

  1. any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.
  2. any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls.
  3. shut-off valves or manual stop valves.

 

Areas that the homeowner should pay special attention to for an inspection:

Heating and Cooling Systems
The inspector will remove the access panels for inspections and access to the data plate.

In the event the gas is off at the furnace (common to find during the summer), the inspector will commonly NOT turn the gas on as it is a potential hazard to operate. This will result in the inspector identifying the system as not functional and recommend further assessment and repair as needed.

Main Electrical Panel and Sub-panels
The inspector will remove the cover panels for inspection of the interior of the panel. This includes items such as cabinet doors installed over these that the cabinet doors/frames are removed if the panel face is captured or cannot be easily removed. In the case where drywall is installed over the panel face and the panel face cannot be removed without cutting or removing finished materials the panel will not be removed, recommend homeowner to remove materials if required prior to the inspection.
Water Heater
The inspector will remove the access panels for inspection.
Sump Pump
Sump pump pits should have clear access with the ability if so designed to lift the pit cover off of the pit for access.
Utility Areas
Utility areas of a basement that are not finished, ideally visual acces to all perimeter foundation walls will be visible and accessible.
Main water supply line and shut-off
Main water supply line and shut-off should be readily accessible for inspection, in the event these are in a finished basement area, recommend removing or opening panels, as well as removing any wall hangings or furniture blocking access.
Attic access openings in a closet
Attic access openings in a closet, if clothes and personal articles are stored in the closet recommend removing, if shelving blocks access recommends removing shelving and hanging rods. In the event clothes are in close proximity recommend removing the clothes to prevent dirt/insulation from falling onto clothes. For ceiling access panels in all areas think of a ladder being needed and room for the inspector to physically access the opening.
Crawl spaces
Crawl spaces for access beneath the home, the inspector needs to have physically access to the opening, the panel needs to be easily removed, if nailed and not screwed shut the panel will commonly not be removed. Often these will be located within a basement above a wash area, if this is the case any appliance blocking access should be pulled out by the home owner. Believe it or not most major concerns are found in the basement and or the crawl spaces, this is especially true with crawl spaces due to the fact theta these are seldom entered or observed by the homeowner.
Garage areas
Garage areas, especially if an attic access is present do not leave cars, boats; trailers large mowers in the garage, often these will block safe access to ceiling access panels and other areas of the garage.
Windows
Average home will have approximately 20 windows, it is a great assistance that all knickknacks be removed from the window area as well as if all blinds are raised or opened for access. It is amazing how much time is saved when this is done by the home owner; it also reduces accidental damage to blinds and personal items.
Doors and Gates
Doors and gates, make sure all are either unlocked or keys for all are available, this includes out buildings.
Pets
Even though you know your dogs are harmless keep in mind the inspector is usually a non-introduced stranger coming into their territory. Animals react differently when their masters are present verses when not present. Please consider removing pets from the home, crating the pets, do not assume that an inspector will enter an area where dogs are left out. On a side note pertaining to pets, please pick up the yard of pet waste and clean litter boxes for everyone’s benefit.

We hope as a home owner you found this information beneficial For further information or assistance with the inspection process, please feel free to contact AA home Inspection LLC by phone (859-448-0213) or via email (info@aahomeinspection.net).